Friday, 26 March 2010

Wake up, people! 1, CRUELTY FOR FASHION.

GRAPHIC POST.
My blog should have content warning but I don't want to trouble my readers to press the button everytime.

It's nice to be ignorant about an animal's suffering, but someone posted a video of a pregnant cow being slaughtered on facebook.... So I started searching some stuff. Gaining knowledge about animal cruelty is suffering. Because we watch them suffer.

It is easy to blame the people who get their hands bloody, but we should also blame ourselves because we drive them to do it. Supply and demand. If nobody wants to buy fur, nobody would make fur.

After seeing how the animals suffer I think that having my phone stolen is just a minute issue. Oh well, I was lucky to have a phone in the first place. I care about animals more because we hold their fate in our hands. (cheesy :D)

KAY, I love animals but I admit being a bloody hypocrite(unsconsciously sub-consciously and consciously). I use leather. I eat chicken(but not pork/beef/etc).

BUT THUS, I SHALL CHANGE. NO MORE LEATHER. And if I ever manage to be a fashion designer one they I won't use materials which causes the animals to suffer. CRUELTY-FREE FASHION. Like Stella McCartney!

FUR & LEATHER, because we have to rip their hide off. Images are particularly graphic. Not gonna lust for designer handbags. Those which contains... animal carcass.


http://www.squidoo.com/christmas_without_cruelty


The animals farmed for their fur are kept in small, barren cages averaging 90x30x40 cm and stereotypical behaviour like self-mutilation and cannibalism occur. They are killed by gassing, neck-breaking or anal electrocution.


I could point you to some links where German-shepherd dogs and badgers are being skinned alive, and they are still alive when all the skin has been taken from their bodies, but these are too harrowing and sickening. I cried uncontrollably when I saw these covertly taken videos and was shaken for weeks (I am still very angry when I think about it, not to mention some of the sick comments). I will not put you through this, you need to take my word for it.
(Passage taken from somewhere else, links above & below)

One day I'm gonna print out these graphic images and hand it out to anyone I see wearing fur. None in Malaysia, I'm glad. Because it's nonsense to wear fur in 36 degree celsius!

SILK

From: http://animals.change.org/blog/category/veganism_and_vegetarianism
The silk worm needs to make a hole in the cocoon in order to emerge in its new-and-improved moth form. But that hole damages part of the cocoon — and the profits — of silk farmers, so before the silk worms can get that far, they're either gassed, steamed, or boiled to death: within their cozy shells. The only silk worms allowed to play out their cycle are those designated to be the breeders to keep the industry going.

Each cocoon will only yield a very, very small amount of silk. For this reason many thousands of cocoons are required to gather enough silk for a garment. For instance, to produce just 40kg of silk, 200kg of cocoons are required and 11.25 tonnes of mulberry leaves. 2500 silkworms are needed just for slightly less than 0.5kg. So, for 40kg, nearly a quarter of a million silkworms have to die.

Sheep are subject to much of the same types of cruelty as other animals used in agriculture: castration without anesthetics, docked tails, inhumane transport, and disease.
(CASTRATION)

A sheep is shorn for the first time when they are about 14-15 months old. They are then shorn annually. Early season shearing in wet, windy and cold conditions mean that the sheep may die from exposure and disease.

Australia, which produces 25-30 percent of the world's wool, uses the particularly brutal method of "mulesing" to prevent problems with fly and maggot infestations. Mulesing solves the problem by cutting out chunks of skin, without painkillers, so the sheep will regrow scar tissue that won't attract flies. Sometimes those wounds end up attracting flies, but the farmers will cut their losses as long as enough sheep stay healthy enough for it to be profitable. The all-important bottom line also means that the shearing process itself is typically brutal because the focus is on time and money, not the animals.

Change.org has some awakening posts on issues like poverty, war, human trafficking.

GO SEE SEE AND OPEN YOUR EYES!

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